Posted 11 hours ago

gang0fwolves:

westendblues:

please stop calling Black children who have different interests and tastes white

it’s damaging and alienating

Posted 4 days ago

girlwithalessonplan:

iamlittlei:

needsmoarwhatever:

ultrafunnypictures:

One of the best examples of artistic integrity on a corporate scale.

I can’t be the only one who finds it interesting that “product of its time” is being used directly alongside “still wrong back then”. Most (privileged, white) people use “product of its time” to avoid admitting that something was wrong regardless of its era and to excuse their repeating it.

Is this real?

If so, A+, Warner Bros.

I hope so!

Posted 2 weeks ago

jtotheizzoe:

spaceplasma:

xysciences:

A gif representing nuclear fusion and how it creates energy. 

[Click for more interesting science facts and gifs]

For those who don’t understand the GIF. It illustrates the Deuterium-Tritium fusion; a deuterium and tritium combine to form a helium-4. Most of the energy released is in the form of the high-energy neutron.

Nuclear fusion has the potential to generate power without the radioactive waste of nuclear fission (energy from splitting heavy atoms  into smaller atoms), but that depends on which atoms you decide to fuse. Hydrogen has three naturally occurring isotopes, sometimes denoted ¹H, ²H, and ³H. Deuterium (²H) - Tritium (³H) fusion (pictured above) appears to be the best and most effective way to produce energy. Atoms that have the same number of protons, but different numbers of neutrons are called isotopes (adding a proton makes a new element, but adding a neutron makes an isotope of the same atom). 

The three most stable isotopes of hydrogen: protium (no neutrons, just one proton, hence the name), deuterium (deuterium comes from the Greek word deuteros, which means “second”, this is in reference two the two particles, a proton and a neutron), and tritium (the name of this comes from the Greek word “tritos” meaning “third”, because guess what, it contains one proton and two neutrons). Here’s a diagram

Deuterium is abundant, it can be extracted from seawater, but tritium is a  radioactive isotope and must be either derived(bred) from lithium or obtained in the operation of the deuterium cycle. Tritium is also produced naturally in the upper atmosphere when cosmic rays strike nitrogen molecules in the air, but that’s extremely rare. It’s also a by product in reactors producing electricity (Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant). Tritium is a low energy beta emitter (unable to penetrate the outer dead layer of human skin), it has a relatively long half life and short biological half life. It is not dangerous externally, however emissions from inhaled or ingested beta particle emitters pose a significant health risk.

During fusion (energy from combining light elements to form heavier ones), two atomic nuclei of the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium must be brought so close together that they fuse in spite of the strongly repulsive electrostatic forces between the positively charged nuclei. So, in order to accomplish nuclear fusion, the two nuclei must first overcome the electric repulsion (coulomb barrier ) to get close enough for the attractive nuclear strong force (force that binds protons and neutrons together in atomic nuclei) to take over to fuse the particles. The D-T reaction is the easiest to bring about, it has the lowest energy requirement compared to energy release. The reaction products are helium-4 (the helium isotope) – also called the alpha particle, which carries 1/5 (3.5 MeV) of the total fusion energy in the form of kinetic energy, and a neutron, which carries 4/5 (14.1 MeV). Don’t be alarmed by the alpha particle, the particles are not dangerous in themselves, it is only because of the high speeds at which they are ejected from the nuclei that make them dangerous, but unlike beta or gamma radiation, they are stopped by a piece of paper.

Some fundamentals of fusion.

(Source: xyprogramming)

Posted 2 weeks ago
Posted 2 weeks ago
fastcompany:

Real-estate developer Jamestown has perfected the art of creating the Next Hot Neighborhood. This is its formula—and where you fit in.
It is Sunday in Brooklyn, the July air oppressive. You get on the subway, heading for the depths of the borough, someplace no one you know lives—yet.
Off the train, phone and maps app in hand, you walk toward the pedestrian underpass of the noisy Brooklyn-Queens Expressway, meandering through a mix of residential buildings, bodegas, factories, and abandoned buildings. And then you find it: a huge, shady courtyard between two towering manufacturing buildings, strung with twinkling lights and tricked out with bars serving sangria, a taco stand, a dance floor, and most importantly, a DJ table.

You’ve arrived at Mister Sunday, one of the best daytime dance parties in New York. A sweaty, multi-ethnic tangle of scantily clad twenty- and thirtysomethings in barely-there rompers and jorts rub shoulders and butts on the dance floor with young parents with babies on their hips and aging disco-era veterans.
This throbbing, vibrant scene will play out each Sunday afternoon through the fall at a place called Industry City, a hulking 16-building industrial complex that had fallen on hard times since peaking in the mid-1900s manufacturing boom.
The hundreds of people who show up each week to party at Mister Sunday are out for a good time. What the carefree fun-seekers likely do not realize is that they are also a part of a powerful real-estate developer’s plan to remake Industry City—and the Sunset Park community in which it sits—into the Next Hot Property (with rents, of course, to match).
Read More>

fastcompany:

Real-estate developer Jamestown has perfected the art of creating the Next Hot Neighborhood. This is its formula—and where you fit in.

It is Sunday in Brooklyn, the July air oppressive. You get on the subway, heading for the depths of the borough, someplace no one you know lives—yet.

Off the train, phone and maps app in hand, you walk toward the pedestrian underpass of the noisy Brooklyn-Queens Expressway, meandering through a mix of residential buildings, bodegas, factories, and abandoned buildings. And then you find it: a huge, shady courtyard between two towering manufacturing buildings, strung with twinkling lights and tricked out with bars serving sangria, a taco stand, a dance floor, and most importantly, a DJ table.

image

You’ve arrived at Mister Sunday, one of the best daytime dance parties in New York. A sweaty, multi-ethnic tangle of scantily clad twenty- and thirtysomethings in barely-there rompers and jorts rub shoulders and butts on the dance floor with young parents with babies on their hips and aging disco-era veterans.

This throbbing, vibrant scene will play out each Sunday afternoon through the fall at a place called Industry City, a hulking 16-building industrial complex that had fallen on hard times since peaking in the mid-1900s manufacturing boom.

The hundreds of people who show up each week to party at Mister Sunday are out for a good time. What the carefree fun-seekers likely do not realize is that they are also a part of a powerful real-estate developer’s plan to remake Industry City—and the Sunset Park community in which it sits—into the Next Hot Property (with rents, of course, to match).

Read More>

Posted 3 weeks ago

Spent the past two weeks away for a while. I thought the queue was empty while I was gone but some still unintentionally got through…

Posted 3 weeks ago
Posted 3 weeks ago

According to Vijay Prashad, who called the acronym “ponderous and overused” in his 2000 book The Karma of Brown Folk, “ABCD” was likely coined in the mid- to late-1980s and used on college and university campuses in the U.S. where subcontinent migrants intersected with younger South Asians born in the U.S. to the post-1965 generation. It was during that same period that the hate group Dotbusters first appeared, publishing a threatening manifesto in a July 1987 issue of the Jersey Journal that read, “We will go to any extreme to get Indians to move out of Jersey City.” It was no idle threat. Between 1985 and 1993, numerous South Asians reported incidents of injuries and harassment.

According to Prashad, racism toward South Asians played an underlying role in the development of the divisive term. “When young people born to the post-1965 migration generation came to college, their lives were lived through U.S. racism.” For first generation subcontinentals, on the other hand Prashad says, “the exposure to racism was not central to their social development. So when they got to college they retreated often into desi enclaves.”

At that point, Prashad says “ABCD” was coined as a counter-slur to “FOB” or “fresh off the boat,” a term thrown at subcontinentals by various American-born South Asians who sought to distance themselves from their immigrant identities. Says Prashad, “It took time and the major racial attacks in the aftermath of 9/11 for these two wings of desis to find common ground and for the terms ABCD and FOB to yield.

Posted 3 weeks ago
Even though it is through social media, how do you cope with racist comments sent to your inbox after a racist "calls you out for not being thankful to white people and all they have done for PoC"? Because I don't know how to NOT be discouraged by racists.
Anonymous asked this

indianilluminati:

hmm, well racists are pea-brained.  It’s hard to get insulted or upset by people who have no idea what they’re talking about. It’s like taking it personally if a child calls you a ‘meanie.’

In regards to that bit about PoC being grateful to white people - PoC literally taught white people all the know.  Mathematics comes from the Middle East (negative numbers from Latin America and the concept of zero from India).  We taught them how to clean themselves and how to build sewage systems (until then they were dying in droves from plagues).  White people and their concept of civilization includes an extremely violent patriarchal system that didn’t exist in many parts of the world until white people came, so I guess we can thank them for overthrowing the matriarchy that preserved peace in India and parts of Africa.

Thank a white person today for all their contributions to the shit we have to deal with today.

Don’t get dejected. Racists have no idea what they’re talking about and their white supremacy comes from a superiority complex about their inferiority complex.

Posted 3 weeks ago

Proof That Voter Impersonation Almost Never Happens - NYTimes.com

politicalprof:

A billion votes … 31 cases of in-person voter fraud. And most of those were of little concern.

Yep: draconian voter ID laws are needed. Because freedom!

Posted 3 weeks ago

Social Security Could Decide Who Controls Congress

Posted 3 weeks ago

theeconomist:

Kal’s cartoon: this week, the US business cycle

Posted 3 weeks ago

newyorker:

Cartoon editor Robert Mankoff illustrates Joshua Rothman’s recent post, “What College Can’t Do,” with cartoons: http://nyr.kr/X4LGcI

Posted 3 weeks ago

sensualproverb:

cubebreaker:

The Rethink Homelessness campaign aims to dispel stereotypes and remind us that the circumstances which lead to living on the streets could happen to each and every one of us.

My heart.

Posted 3 weeks ago
You don’t necessarily have to be hustling in New York working 70 hours a week. There are plenty of places to live where you can have a better work-life balance and still make enough to make ends meet.