Posted 22 hours ago

artoftheautomobile:

drivenetwork:

Making 280mph Capable Carbon Fiber Wheels - /INSIDE KOENIGSEGG

I found this very interesting.

What I love about Christian von Koenigsegg and Horacio Pagani is that create their own supercars - cars that that they envision in their minds. I would not hesitate to say that Koenigsegg and Pagani are industry leaders in high performance supercars as well. They are both innovative in completely different ways. It’s great to see that they are always both fused in the whole process of making their cars and are always able to talk about them in documentaries, interviews, videos etc. You can’t say the same for any other car manufacturer, but I guess because Pagani and Koenigsegg are still relatively new as car manufacturers the founders are still around. But still, the fact that they are arguably still the newest supercar manufacturers shows how far they’ve come in a small amount of time. Arguably, Pagani and Koenigsegg are the two brands that you’d probably associate with the best cars ever made. I like the fact that they they’re not making fuckin’ SUVs or cars for the masses because they don’t care about you. Their vision is to make the best car how ever long it takes and that is what keeps their exclusivity and appeal.

Kudos to them for being alive.

Posted 22 hours ago
Posted 23 hours ago
fastcompany:

The Spark sounds like a maraca but is actually an energy-generating gadget.

Sudha Kheterpal has been a professional percussionist for 20 years, so she knows how much energy goes into making a beat. Now, she wants to harness that energy to generate power.
Read More>

fastcompany:

The Spark sounds like a maraca but is actually an energy-generating gadget.

image

Sudha Kheterpal has been a professional percussionist for 20 years, so she knows how much energy goes into making a beat. Now, she wants to harness that energy to generate power.

Read More>

Posted 23 hours ago

micdotcom:

"Corrupt, Fucked, and Broken:" What young people really think of the political system

America’s next leaders think the government is fucked. Pure and simple, young adults are disillusioned with the current political system. The people who will be the future leaders of America say politics today are corrupt, inefficient and messy — words that only begin to underline the disgust many young people feel. 

That’s what a recent Mic survey of 666 people under the age of 34 from every state said when asked to describe today’s American political environment. When asked to use one word to describe it, nearly all respondents included negative terms. Shit. Messy. Ineffective. Oligarchy. These are the damning terms respondents turned to when describing American politics.  

How did we get here | Follow micdotcom 

Posted 23 hours ago

thinksquad:

Members of Congress have no shame editing their Wikipedia pages. Luckily, a new tool lets Americans keep an eye on the encyclopedic shenanigans of our elected leaders.

A Twitter account, @congressedits, tweets whenever someone from a congressional IP address edits Wikipedia. So far, it’s gotten most attention for a few hilariously odd pages to edit — one staffer (or representative) made a slight change to the sentence structure of the plot summary of Step Up 3D, while another added Barack Obama’s recent run-in to the ‘horse head mask’ page.

http://mic.com/articles/93484/you-can-now-tell-when-congressional-staffers-are-tampering-with-wikipedia-entries

Posted 1 day ago

thinksquad:

Portraits of four Pennsylvania lawmakers that hang in the State Capitol building in Harrisburg will now indicate they were convicted of a crime.

“There was a question: ‘Do you remove the portraits or do you do something else?’” said Stephen Miskin, a spokesman for House Speaker Sam Smith, a Republican from Punxsutawney. “You can’t change history, whether you like it or not. There was a feeling you should keep the portraits out there and let people make up their own mind.”

The lawmakers’ criminal activity will now be inscribed on a plaque that identifies their portraits, and is a result of several members concern over what to do following the two most recent convictions in 2011 and 2012.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/govbeat/wp/2014/07/17/pennsylvania-will-now-shame-convicted-lawmakers-with-plaques-that-note-their-crimes/?Post+generic=%3Ftid%3Dsm_twitter_washingtonpost

Posted 1 day ago
Posted 1 day ago
All of that, though, pales to the one-two punch of Islamophobia and xenophobia perpetrated by Breitbart News, which excitedly reported last week on the discovery of a “Muslim prayer rug found near the border in Arizona.” The “prayer rug” turned out to be an old Adidas soccer jersey, but the story nonetheless got a Drudge link and rattled around the conservative blogosphere as proof that dangerous Muslims were sneaking into America through Mexico.
Posted 1 day ago
Posted 1 day ago
Posted 1 day ago
themaninthegreenshirt:

“No matter what it is with god his gracious and merciful. His way is through love in which we all are. It is truly - A Love Supreme.” John Coltrane

themaninthegreenshirt:

“No matter what it is with god his gracious and merciful. His way is through love in which we all are. It is truly - A Love Supreme.” John Coltrane

Posted 1 day ago

theeconomist:

Kal’s cartoon: this week, the Middle East

Posted 1 day ago

Gaza, Ctd.

letterstomycountry:

This war will only end when Hamas either stops shooting rockets into Israel, or runs out of rockets, whichever comes first. Also, if Hamas doesn’t want a hospital to be bombed, then stop shooting rockets from the hospital!

This is a very common response directed towards people who criticize Israel’s use of force in the Occupied Territories.  I think it is unpersuasive, for the following reasons.

  1. The logic being employed here looks a lot like victim-blaming.  The IDF, to its credit, in what seems to be an acknowledgment that not every single person living in Palestine is a terrorist, called the Director of the Hospital and told him to evacuate the building.  But this probably means that militant Hamas members who may have been occupying the building would also have evacuated it as well.  Will this deny them a base of operations?  Perhaps.  But only temporarily.  Hamas is waging something akin to a guerrilla war against Israel.  History suggests that the militant wing of Hamas will find other places to go, and  the rockets will not in fact stop.  So in the end, all that was likely achieved by the hospital strike was that a vital civilian resource—a hospital—was destroyed.

  2. Hamas may not care if a hospital gets bombed, but the patients who rely on that hospital probably do.  Not every Palestinian living in Gaza supports Hamas, but the Israeli military often behaves as if this were true.  Some claim that Hamas forces civilians to act as human shields.  But if that’s true, then those civilians are unwilling participants in the violence.  They are therefore still “innocent,” and however despicable this tactic may be on the part of Hamas, it is equally despicable to carry out military strikes in disregard for these peoples’ lives.  This idea that the residents of Gaza are all expendable in the fight against Hamas is morally objectionable.  To risk an analogy, few people would agree that it’s ok to shoot through a hostage to kill their captor.  But that is precisely what the Israeli military does every time it bombs civilian infrastructure in Gaza, and then justifies civilian deaths by claiming that Hamas is forcing civilians to be “human shields.”

  3. As I’ve said many times on this blog, the reason why Hamas has the degree of political influence they have is because the Israeli government actively empowers them through its policies in the Occupied Territories.  Gaza and the West Bank are open-air prisons.  Freedom of movement, commerce, and expression is restricted in numerous ways by the Israeli Government in a manner which most reasonable people would view as intolerable.  To take one example: A former U.S. diplomat once noted in a leaked cable that the policy of the Israeli Government is to “keep the Gazan economy on the brink of collapse without quite pushing it over the edge,” and to keep the Palestinian economy "functioning at the lowest level possible consistent with avoiding a humanitarian crisis."  Dov Weisglass, a former senior Israeli official, put it this way: “The idea is to put the Palestinians on a diet, but not to make them die of hunger.”  It should come as no surprise that at least a portion of the Palestinians living in the Occupied Territories have become so frustrated and angry by the mistreatment they receive at the hands of the Israeli government that they take up arms to violently resist.  Which  brings me to my next point…

  4. What is it that keeps the rockets coming?  Ostensibly, there are two primary reasons: the first is that some members of Hamas views Israel as an illegitimate state and will never accept its right to exist under any circumstances.  There is little, if anything that Israel can do to change this.  However, another reason why these rockets keep coming is that it remains one of the few accessible ways that residents of the Occupied Territories have to fight back against an occupying force—one they view as the source of their oppression.  When that oppression ends, support for Hamas will dry up considerably.  And—I humbly submit—the number of rockets being fired into Israel will also shrink considerably.

  5. Whether the Israeli government likes it or not, this is a guerrilla war.  The Israeli government has blown up hospitals before.  It has blown up schools before.  It has blown up homes before.  Yet the rockets always keep coming.  They keep coming in part because the IDF can’t be everywhere all the time.  But mostly they keep coming because residents of the Occupied Territories find a new reason to legitimate Hamas’s violence every time another Palestinian house, business, or family gets blown to pieces by an Israeli bomb.  

With all this being said, the greatest impetus for rocket fire into Israel, in my opinion, is the Israeli government’s ongoing military occupation of Gaza and the West Bank.  The Israeli government’s policies toward the residents of these areas generate resentment, anger, and hatred in those affected by them. As a result, a portion of the Palestinian population is invariably radicalized by the trauma of enduring the Israeli government’s policies, and they come to view violent resistance as reasonable.  This violent resistance is in turn empowered by foreign sponsors who sympathize with the plight of the Palestinian people (e.g. Iran, Hezbollah).

That’s why the rockets won’t stop coming until Israel ends the Occupation.  Militants will always find ways to commit violence against Israel.  The only true way to stop these attacks is to remove the impetus for them.  That impetus is, for the most part, the Occupation.  The Occupation is the lifeblood of Palestinian resentment towards Israel.  It is the Occupation that radicalizes the Palestinian population.  It is the Occupation that empowers militants through the sympathy of foreign sponsors.  And it is the Occupation that continues to put the lives of Israelis in danger every day.

One final note: it bears mention that I’m not suggesting that ending the Occupation will mean Israel never suffers another terrorist attack.  What I am suggesting is that Israel’s policies in the Occupied Territories are a large motivator for those attacks, and changing those policies would reduce the number of rocket attacks considerably.  It would also deprive Hamas of political legitimacy, because ending the Occupation robs Hamas of most of their talking points.  This would deprive Hamas of political power, which would reduce their ability to finance their militant wing.  That means less rocket attacks, and a safer Israel.

Posted 2 days ago
I don’t think you have a soul.
Posted 2 days ago

cjchivers:

A Catastrophically Insufficient Restriction.

This is the map and Notice to Airmen issued by Ukraine on July 14, hours after a Ukrainian military Antonov was downed by a guided surface-to-air missile as it flew near the border with Russia.  Note Lines F and G of the text in the upper left corner and the shaded area in red.

The notice added 6,000 feet of altitude to the airspace closures in eastern Ukraine, which had previously been set from the ground to 26,000 feet. Thus, this notice forbid civilian traffic beneath 32,000 feet.

From a weapons perspective, this is a very curious decision, given that the class of guided missile implicated in the downing of the Antonov has ranges that can extend, depending on the variants, to altitudes above 70,000 feet.

Put bluntly, Ukraine’s restriction offered no protection to aircraft from a weapon newly in play in the conflict. It was, to use a crude example, akin to telling someone who is standing 10 feet from an angry drunk with a loaded pistol to move a few feet further away.  

Actually, that example is not quite right, because transiting international aircraft over eastern Ukraine already flew over the separatist area at standard cruising altitudes higher than 26,000 and usually higher than 32,000 feet. To comply with the new restriction they did not have to change their behaviors with regard to altitude — at all. This is in spite of the fact that they were in chip-shot range for a class of missiles that had reportedly slipped out state hands, and had been recently fired. So this is more like telling the man already standing 10 feet away from the armed drunk that he should not get within 8 feet. 

When MH17 took off from Amsterdam on July 17 with 298 souls aboard its crew followed an approved flight plan into this red shaded area. The flight’s route and the crew’s behaviors, according to the information publicly available so far, complied with the guidelines set by relevant authorities charged with ensuring aviation safety. But the steps these authorities had taken offered the plane and the people aboard no protection whatsoever against what happened next.

Why? One reason seems to be that the authorities and the aviation safety community did not take the obvious step of aligning the airspace restrictions with the range of antiaircraft weapons newly used in the war. Had that been done, one clear conclusion might have been that the only way to ensure civilian air traffic over the conflict area was safe from the missiles below would be to close the airspace completely and direct air carriers to plan routes around.

Civilian jetliners do not fly nearly as high as this class of weapon, have no defenses against them and cannot withstand their punch. 

Given the capabilities of the weapons involved, and recently used (under circumstances that remained cloudy), there was no fully safe route overhead. The safeguards were not safeguards at all.